Archive | November, 2014

(Deliberate) Practice Makes Perfect

6 Nov

Practice makes perfect. It’s a very famous quote that I’ve heard and read since I was a child.
Practice makes perfect

But is it true? The answer is both yes and no.

Yes
When we perform an activity – any activity – for the first time, we don’t do it correctly. Reading and writing for kids, calculus for high-school students, driving, piano, soccer, everything is learned. The more we do it repetitively, the better we get at doing it. Practicing piano for a few hours every day makes us better than practicing for a few hours every week. Though inherent talent, intrinsic motivation, feedback, and support or coaching does play a role.

So the answer is yes, practice does make us better- not perfect – but better, which is okay since perfection has a different meaning for everyone.

No
Practice makes us better only to a certain extent. After that, practicing more doesn’t necessarily lead to an improvement in skills. Why? This is where “deliberate” comes into the picture. You need to figure out what parts of a skill you have mastered and what parts you still need to get a grip on, so you can make a “deliberate” decision to practice only those parts that you are not yet proficient in. While playing the piano, it might be certain types of notes. In tennis, it might be the backhand. In physics or math, it might be a certain topic or problem. Practicing everything, all the time, only wastes time. More time should be devoted to learning new skills.

Metacognition
In cognitive psychology, researchers call it metacognition, the knowledge about one’s own knowledge. If you are aware of how much you know and how much you need to learn, you’ll be able to use different strategies to learn the content or skills.

Adaptive learning
A common buzzword these days is adaptive learning, which has different meaning for different people, but it generally means the content or assessment adapting¬† to the learner’s knowledge or skill level. If you answer a few questions correctly, you are presented with a higher-order content or questions. If you don’t do it well, you get lower-order content. This way, you spend your time learning new or higher-order things, and not spending a lot of time on content that you already know well. This is the premise of my adaptive learning model for K12.

Related readings
Over-Practicing Makes Perfect
No. 1 Reason Practice Makes Perfect